Česky English

Kyjov


date interpreter genre
2.6.
Saturday

JAN KELLER / violoncello

IVO KAHÁNEK / piano

 
25.6.
Monday

CLAIRE CHEVALLIER / hammer piano

 

The first known mention of Kyjov in writing dates back to 1126, but the place where the town stands today was settled already in prehistoric times as attested by archaeological finds from the Palaeolithic, Neolithic, Eneolithic, Bronze, and Iron Ages, the time of ancient Rome, and the time of the migration of nations. There is also evidence of an early Slavic settlement. In the twelfth century Abbot Michal of the monastery in Hradiště contributed to the development of Kyjov by having a church built of stone in Romanesque style, dedicated to St. Martin, protector of towns. The Premons-tratensians established a marketplace whose size and shape have survived to this day as the town common. In 1201 Kyjov officially became a městečko ('small town'). Then in 1284 King Václav (Wenceslas) II had it fortified with a palisade, an earthen wall, and a moat. Starting in 1548 Kyjov could boast of being officially a 'royal town'. Because of its strategic location Kyjov became the target of frequent raids and military campaigns. During the seventeenth century it was sacked and burned several times.

 

Historical landmarks include a Renaissance town hall erected by Italian builders in 1561–62, an early Baroque column dedicated with a statue of St. Immaculata, the stately home from 1540 which is the oldest surviving building in the town, decorated with sgrafitto in 1911 by Jano Köhler (since 1928 housing the local museum), the Parish Church of the Assumption of the Virgin Mary (originally Capuchi-nian), the Chapel of St. Joseph, the Chapel of St. Roch, and the former poorhouse of Dominik Jurovský in Baroque style, which served as a refuge for twelve townspeople who had lost their fortunes. Kyjov lies on the edge of the relatively warm Pannonian Basin, protected from the north by the green hills of the Îdánice Forest and the Chřiby Hills. Thanks to its situation, local viniculture has a specific character. Typical of Kyjov wines, thanks to the more northerly location of the vineyards, are earlier varieties of grapes: Moravian Muškát, Grey Ruland, Rhine Riesling, and Müller Thurgau. Two viniculture paths pass through Kyjov – the Moravian Viniculture Path and the Kyjov Viniculture Path. They lead mainly through vineyards and orchards, primarily along minor roads. The picturesque valley of Kyjov Creek is rich in the traditions of folk customs, good wine, and beautiful folk songs. The 'Slovácko Year', the largest folklore celebration in the region, held once every four years and famous not only for its review of cymbalom bands but also for the Ride of the Kings. Held here in mid-August each year is the Kyjov Summer Festival, and in November the Feast of St. Martin. Traditional gatherings with cimbalom music are held on Christmas Day and Easter Sunday. Since 2003 Kyjov has been the administrative centre for another forty-one communities in the area, which is divided into the following micro-regions: Babí lom, Ždánicko, Hovoransko, Nový Dvůr, Moštěnka, Podchřibí, Bzenecko, Ždánský les – Politaví, and Severovýchod.

 

 

More information on city and region:

www.ickyjov.cz

www.kyjovsko.cz

www.mestokyjov.cz

 

Kyjov radnice

Kyjov radnice

Noční náměstí

Noční náměstí

kostel Nanebevzetí Panny Marie

kostel Nanebevzetí Panny Marie

Zámek Milotice

Zámek Milotice

zámek Milotice - letecký snímek

zámek Milotice - letecký snímek

zahrada v Miloticích

zahrada v Miloticích

Slovácký rok v Kyjově

Slovácký rok v Kyjově

Jízda králů ze Skoronic

Jízda králů ze Skoronic

Slovácký rok v Kyjově

Slovácký rok v Kyjově

 

Copyright © 2010 Concentus Moraviae  |  Published by system inCMS  |  Webdesign Inexes