Česky English

Třebíč


date interpreter genre
17.6.
Sunday

MUSICA FLOREA

MAREK ŠTRYNCL / artistic leader

 
26.6.
Tuesday

TOMÁŠ ŠULAJ / voice

KAREL KOŠÁREK / piano

 

The town of Třebíč has almost 40,000 inhabitants and as such it is the natural cultural, social and administrative centre of south-western Moravia. It lies on the notional line of the Brno – Jihlava route. Prague is 180 km from Třebíč, while Vienna is 140 km away. The town stretches out on both banks of the Jihlava River, which forms the natural axis for both the town and the entire region. The jagged and mountainous features of the surrounding landscape are characteristic for the Bohemian-Moravian Highlands. An important milestone for the town is the date of 3rd July 2003 when the Třebíč Jewish Quarter and Jewish cemetery and the Romano-Gothic Basilica of Saint Procopius were entered into the prestigious UNESCO Register of World Cultural and Natural Heritage as the 12th monument in the Czech Republic and the first Jewish monument outside the state of Israel. The experts acknowledged the exceptional nature of both monuments as mute witnesses to the peaceful coexistence of both cultures: Christian and Jewish.

 

Třebíč boasts a long and rich history which stretches back to the beginning of the 12th century when a Benedictine monastery was established in the so-called Třebíč Forest. A craft and trading centre grew up under the monastery along both banks of the Jihlava River and Charles IV (at that time the Margrave of Moravia) and his father John of Luxemburg granted the settlement town privileges in 1335. The coat of arms of Třebíč depicts three monks’ hoods in memory of the munificent founding gesture of the Benedictines.

 

The most important Třebíč monuments without doubt include the Basilica of Saint Procopius, a jewel of medieval European architecture. The basilica has been damaged many times over the centuries. After the closure of the monastery, it was used for non-ecclesiastical purposes for more than two centuries. It was used for sacred purposes again and consecrated to Saint Procopius after renovation work had been carried out by the architect F. M. Kaňka in 1725-1733.

 

The Jewish Quarter has 123 houses and it is unique in Europe from an urban and historical point of view. The first mention of the Jewish settlement dates from 1338, but the Second World War meant the violent end of the Třebíč Jews. The Zadní (Rear) Synagogue dating from 1669 with its unique baroque paintings is especially worth seeing. The Jewish cemetery, which includes three thousand headstones, is one of the largest in the Republic.

 

The Třebíč Vysočina Museum is based in the Třebíč château which arose from the gradual transformation of the former Benedictine monastery. The museum was reconstructed during the last three years and nowadays there are four interesting expositions prepared for visitors: I The world of inanimate nature, II The world of archs and gateways, III Valdsteins in Třebíč Region, IV People, Places, Destinies.

 

Třebíč has always lived an intensive social and cultural life. The wide range of annually held cultural events, festivals and town celebrations is based on the town’s musical and theatrical traditions. The most significant events include the Czech-Austrian musical projects, the Třebíč Puppet Spring, the professional theatre festival entitled the Festival of Theatre with 2-3-4 Actors, concerts within the framework of international music festivals such as Concentus Moraviae, Pontes and Mahler’s Jihlava, the Country-Fest, the Třebíč Jewish Festival, the UNESCO Medieval Celebrations, the Folklore Celebrations and so on. Mention must also be made of the town’s rich literary traditions. Třebič is irrevocably associated with many personalities from Czech literature, including Vítězslav Nezval, Jan Zahradníček, Jakub Deml and Oldřich Mikulášek. A permanent exhibition dedicated to the significant poet, translator and artist, Ladislav Novák, was opened in the Jewish Quarter (the U Synagogy Guesthouse) in 2002. Třebíč boasts a rich cultural and musical history, from which many famous names have emerged. Natives of Třebíč include the tenor, ensemble leader and composer, František Václav Míča, who was the author of the first Czech opera on the establishment of the Town of Jaroměřice. At present, several musical ensembles are active in the town. They range from smaller chamber ensembles through to large church choirs.

 

Třebíč is the only UNESCO location in Central Europe, from where a further 11 UNESCO locations in the Czech Republic and Upper Austria are accessible within 2 hours by car.

 

More information on Třebíč:

www.trebic.cz

www.mkstrebic.cz

 

Řeka Jihlava s bazilikou sv. Prokopa

Řeka Jihlava s bazilikou sv. Prokopa

bazilika sv. Prokopa

bazilika sv. Prokopa

bazilika sv. Prokopa - zahájení 2011

bazilika sv. Prokopa - zahájení 2011

bazilika sv. Prokopa - zahájení 2011

bazilika sv. Prokopa - zahájení 2011

Bazilika Sv. Prokopa

Bazilika Sv. Prokopa

Židovská čtvť

Židovská čtvť

Zadní synagoga

Zadní synagoga

Interiér Zadní synagogy

Interiér Zadní synagogy

 

Copyright © 2010 Concentus Moraviae  |  Published by system inCMS  |  Webdesign Inexes